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Sep 272015
 

We have received the following nominations for aaDH Executive Committee positions for election in 2015. The Association seeks to elect a President, Secretary (resident in Victoria), and Ordinary Member, for 3-year terms, and a Communications Manager for a 2-year term, beginning in late 2015. Further information about the election will be distributed to members.

Nominations for President:
Hart Cohen
Sarah Kenderdine

Nominations for Secretary:
Simon Musgrave (there being no other nomination for Secretary, Simon Musgrave is elected to that position)

Nominations for Communications Manager:
Tully Barnett
Mike Jones
Ingrid Mason

Nominations for Ordinary Member:
Tully Barnett
Mike Jones
Ingrid Mason
Camellia Webb-Gannon
Simon Musgrave (there being no other nomination for Secretary, Simon Musgrave is elected to that position)

Statements from each candidate are listed below.

Nominations for President:

Associate Professor Hart Cohen (return to top of page)
I am seeking to nominate for the position of President of AADH. I am a current member (2015). I am seeking this nomination on the basis of my identification as a researcher and advocate for the Digital Humanities primarily in my roles as Associate Professor in Media Arts in the School of Humanities and Communication Arts and as a member of the Digital Humanities Research Group as well as the Institute for Cultural and Society at Western Sydney University, Australia. I have led three Australian Research Council Projects related to the Strehlow Collection held at the Strehlow Research Centre in Alice Springs in the last 15 years. All projects were related to the digitisation of this unique collection. In this regard I have been researching in the Digital Humanities space from 1998. I am currently working on a project titled, Digital archives, data diversity and discoverability: the Strehlow Collection as knowledge resource for remote indigenous communities. I have published widely with the most recent work titled, Film as Cultural Memory: The Struggle for Repatriation and Restitution of Cultural Property in Central Australia, in Cultural Memories of Nonviolent Struggles: Powerful Times, Katriel, T. and Reading, A., eds., Palgrave Macmillan: Hampshire. I have an article in press (with Dr Rachel Morley), The Visual Mediation of a Complex Narrative: The Small Worlds of Journey To Horseshoe Bend, in the Journal of Scholarly and Research Communication as part of the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) project publication (Professor Ray Siemens, editor).

I have a book in development placed with Ashgate’s Digital Humanities series titled, The Strehlow Archive: Explorations in old and new media. The book is divided into a series of chapters that identify different aspects of the Strehlow archive, its community of interest and various projects that have extended the archive through digital affordances. The engagement with the archive and its transformation is informed by discussions referenced by contemporary theorists of media and the digital humanities. I am an editor (chief of staff) of the Global Media Journal/ Australia Edition For many years I was Research and HDR Director in the School of Humanities and Communication Arts. In this regard I bring substantial experience of research in the HASS sector. My academic and administrative experience will enable strong leadership in the position of President to advocate for AADH. I have current research affiliations as Research Associate and Adjunct Researcher respectively with The Strehlow Research Centre, Alice Springs and Sensorium: Centre for Digital Arts and Technology, York University, Toronto, Canada.

Professor Sarah Kenderdine (return to top of page)
A former maritime archaeologist and museum curator, I have been engaged in digital cultural heritage research for much of my career with a strong focus on Asia region and scholarly and applied outcomes worldwide. I would bring this experience to the role of president of aaDH at an important time, when digital humanities as a field is growing so rapidly. I believe we need to advocate strongly for greater recognition of the value of digital research, actively support alt-ac career pathways and create opportunities and funding for early career training. I am also committed to trans-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary research frameworks and, to partnerships between Academia, Government and Industry. I would focus on further increasing the profile and standing of the Association through engagement across these sectors. I am currently Professor and Director of iGLAM (Laboratory for Innovation in Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums) and, founding Director of Visualisation for the new Expanded Perception and Interaction Centre (EPICentre) and Medical Innovation through Immersive Visualisation (M+) project at the University of New South Wales. I’m also co-Director at the iCinema Research Centre and Deputy Director of the National Institute for Experimental Arts (NIEA). I have an ongoing role as Head of Special Projects at Museum Victoria.Before joining UNSW, I was Director of Research at the Applied Laboratory for Interactive Visualization and Embodiment (ALiVE), City University of Hong Kong.

My research is focused at the forefront of interactive and immersive experiences for museums and galleries amalgamating cultural heritage with new media art practice, especially in the realms of interactive cinema, augmented reality and embodied narrative. As a pioneer in the field digital heritage, digital humanities and data visualization and immersive environment design, I’m a regular keynote speaker at related forums internationally. In the last 10 years I have created over 80 installations many focused on world heritage sites. Many of these are award-winning including the new Place-Hampi museum in South India. My recent books include the co-edited, co-authored Theorizing Digital Cultural Heritage: a critical discourse, Cambridge: MIT Press, 2007 (third reprint 2010) and PLACE-Hampi: Inhabiting the Panoramic Imaginary of Vijayanagara, Heidelberg: Kehrer Verlag, 2013. In 2015, I will complete a co-authored monograph Theorizing digital cultural heritage for a complex, turbulent and entangled world, MIT Press.

Nominations for Secretary:

Simon Musgrave (return to top of page)
The role of linguistics in the development of DH has always been seen as important. However, that perspective has been based mainly on the contribution of corpus linguistics. As someone who completed a PhD in 2001, I see myself as part of the first generation of linguists who are involved in and contribute to DH more widely. From around the turn of the century, born-digital data has been the standard in many sub-fields of linguistics; handling such data and being comfortable with digital tools (often combined in complex workflows) have become essential skills for researchers across the discipline. In my own career, this has involved capturing and managing data from field work, working on a database project in language typology, contributing to debates on the use of clustering algorithms in historical linguistics, and being involved in the development of the Australian National Corpus project.

My current research includes a project which aims to establish a framework for presentation of language description online through reworking a classic description of an Australian language (with Nick Thieberger, University of Melbourne), and a project using ontologies to develop search strategies for aggregations of language data with varying annotations (with Michael Haugh and Andrea Schalley, Griffith University). I have also been a major contributor to discussions aimed at the development of DH within my faculty and through interfaculty collaborations at Monash. This has led to the creation of one of the first (to my knowledge) undergraduate units in DH in Australia for which I am co-ordinator, and also to ongoing efforts to enhance collaboration in the DH area, both teaching and research, with Monash’s partner university, the University of Warwick.

Nominations for Communications Manager:

Dr Tully Barnett (return to top of page)
I am a Research Fellow in the School of Humanities and Creative Arts at Flinders University in South Australia, as part of an ARC Linkage Project called Laboratory Adelaide: The Value of Culture using quantitative and qualitative methodologies to explore different ways of understanding and communicating the value of culture and the arts beyond bums on seats and economic impact. In addition to this academic position, I am Associate Director of the Australasian Consortium of Humanities Research Centres. In this capacity, I work productively with a director and advisory board to build capacity and shared knowledge in Humanities research. I facilitate networking and collaboration in Australasia and publish a periodic newsletter. The ACHRC has a memorandum of understanding with the aaDH and it is through this capacity that I co-convened with Paul Arthur “Building Communities and Networks in the Humanities,” at DH2015. This successful and engaging pre-conference public event brought Digital Humanities scholars into discussion with the broader Humanities community. I also engage in Humanities advocacy (https://theconversation.com/are-the-humanities-in-crisis-in-australia-the-sector-is-thriving-39873).

As an early career researcher, I have built on my doctoral research on representations of information technology in contemporary fiction in the so-called “late age of print and my work with AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource to develop a research profile in reading in digital environments and a cultural studies approach to mass digitisation projects like Project Gutenberg, Google Books and the Internet Archive. Amongst other research, my article “Social Reading: The Kindle’s Social Highlighting Function and Emerging Reading Practices” was published in Australian Humanities Review 56 (2014) http://www.australianhumanitiesreview.org/archive/Issue-May-2014/barnett.html and I have forthcoming “Platforms for Social Reading: The Material Book’s Return” in Scholarly and Research Communication 6.2 (2015). Through all of these roles of I have demonstrated commitment to service and teamwork and high level organisational and communication skills.

Mike Jones (return to top of page)
I am an archivist, researcher and history postgraduate with a strong interest in sustainable digital humanities practice and a significant social media presence in the field. After six and a half years at the University of Melbourne’s eScholarship Research Centre (ESRC) I was awarded the McCoy Project STRAPA (Strategic Australian Postgraduate Award) and commenced my PhD in mid-December 2014. While undertaking postgraduate research I am a Research Associate at Museum Victoria, continue to work as a Consultant Research Archivist at the ESRC, and provide support to government and community-based digital projects as an independent consultant. My primary interest is in collaborative digital projects which seek to make knowledge more accessible and understandable. My experience spans the GLAM sector, including a Masters by Research in Art History (The University of Edinburgh), extensive experience as a professional archivist, strong connections with academic and public library professionals, and my current research on the digital management and dissemination of interconnected archival and artefactual collections in museums.

I have held significant positions on numerous digital projects, collaborating with academics, government departments, community organisations and the GLAM sector, most notably as Lead Archivist and acting National Program Manager for the Australian Government funded Find & Connect Web Resource Project. Other activities include collaboration with Rebe Taylor and Gavan McCarthy on the Mander Jones-winning Stories in Stone annotated history and archival guide, Advisory Group Member on the University of Melbourne’s digital research data and records preservation strategy, Ordinary Member on the Victorian Committee of the Australian Society of Archivists (ASA), and reviewer for conferences (including DH2015) and journals. In recent years I have published and presented extensively, am active on Twitter, and blog about archives, the GLAM sector and digital resources. With reference to the Communications Manager committee position, my experience also includes significant involvement in developing, negotiating and managing a communication plan for the National Find & Connect Web Resource Project, including a newsletter, mailing list, blog and Twitter presence. For more, including a list of publications and presentations, see: http://www.mikejonesonline.com/

Ingrid Mason (return to top of page)
In 2009 I participated in the inaugural Day of the Digital Humanities. What I was doing then and what I do today is draw upon knowledge of humanities scholarship and apply professional experience and skills to the design and delivery of research infrastructure services. In whatever role I have played as data and technology support professional I have advocated for this research community, collaborated within and where opportunity has arisen participated in events and research projects. The advocacy has involved delivering presentations at the eResearch Australasia, THETA and VALA conferences articulating the needs of digital humanities researchers and observations on the evolution of the research practice. The collaboration has involved coordinating and aligning an international event (2015 LODLAM Summit) with the international Digital Humanities conference and reviewing papers and chairing a session on linked open data. The participation has involved attending in the Australasian Association’s biennial conferences and joining in on or helping to coordinate THATCamps.

In the world of “eResearch” dominated by an understanding of data and technology intensive science I am committed to raising awareness and increasing understanding about the research practices and infrastructure needs of digital humanities researchers. The public biography provided for public speaking engagements makes plain my interest in the research community: “I am a self-professed metadata nerd and technologist who has found a work-space that satisfies my interests in culture, the humanities, semantics and the web.” I am committed to supporting and engaging colleagues both in their research or support roles in digital humanities. Where feasible I would also like to influence decision-makers in their thinking and funders in their investment choices, to the benefit of this research community.

Nominations for Ordinary Member

Tully Barnett (return to top of page)
I am a Research Fellow in the School of Humanities and Creative Arts at Flinders University in South Australia, as part of an ARC Linkage Project called Laboratory Adelaide: The Value of Culture using quantitative and qualitative methodologies to explore different ways of understanding and communicating the value of culture and the arts beyond bums on seats and economic impact. In addition to this academic position, I am Associate Director of the Australasian Consortium of Humanities Research Centres. In this capacity, I work productively with a director and advisory board to build capacity and shared knowledge in Humanities research. I facilitate networking and collaboration in Australasia and publish a periodic newsletter. The ACHRC has a memorandum of understanding with the aaDH and it is through this capacity that I co-convened with Paul Arthur “Building Communities and Networks in the Humanities,” at DH2015. This successful and engaging pre-conference public event brought Digital Humanities scholars into discussion with the broader Humanities community. I also engage in Humanities advocacy (https://theconversation.com/are-the-humanities-in-crisis-in-australia-the-sector-is-thriving-39873).

As an early career researcher, I have built on my doctoral research on representations of information technology in contemporary fiction in the so-called “late age of print and my work with AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource to develop a research profile in reading in digital environments and a cultural studies approach to mass digitisation projects like Project Gutenberg, Google Books and the Internet Archive. Amongst other research, my article “Social Reading: The Kindle’s Social Highlighting Function and Emerging Reading Practices” was published in Australian Humanities Review 56 (2014) http://www.australianhumanitiesreview.org/archive/Issue-May-2014/barnett.html and I have forthcoming “Platforms for Social Reading: The Material Book’s Return” in Scholarly and Research Communication 6.2 (2015). Through all of these roles of I have demonstrated commitment to service and teamwork and high level organisational and communication skills.

Mike Jones (return to top of page)
I am an archivist, researcher and history postgraduate with a strong interest in sustainable digital humanities practice and a significant social media presence in the field. After six and a half years at the University of Melbourne’s eScholarship Research Centre (ESRC) I was awarded the McCoy Project STRAPA (Strategic Australian Postgraduate Award) and commenced my PhD in mid-December 2014. While undertaking postgraduate research I am a Research Associate at Museum Victoria, continue to work as a Consultant Research Archivist at the ESRC, and provide support to government and community-based digital projects as an independent consultant. My primary interest is in collaborative digital projects which seek to make knowledge more accessible and understandable. My experience spans the GLAM sector, including a Masters by Research in Art History (The University of Edinburgh), extensive experience as a professional archivist, strong connections with academic and public library professionals, and my current research on the digital management and dissemination of interconnected archival and artefactual collections in museums.

I have held significant positions on numerous digital projects, collaborating with academics, government departments, community organisations and the GLAM sector, most notably as Lead Archivist and acting National Program Manager for the Australian Government funded Find & Connect Web Resource Project. Other activities include collaboration with Rebe Taylor and Gavan McCarthy on the Mander Jones-winning Stories in Stone annotated history and archival guide, Advisory Group Member on the University of Melbourne’s digital research data and records preservation strategy, Ordinary Member on the Victorian Committee of the Australian Society of Archivists (ASA), and reviewer for conferences (including DH2015) and journals. In recent years I have published and presented extensively, am active on Twitter, and blog about archives, the GLAM sector and digital resources. For more, including a list of publications and presentations, see: http://www.mikejonesonline.com/

Ingrid Mason (return to top of page)
In 2009 I participated in the inaugural Day of the Digital Humanities. What I was doing then and what I do today is draw upon knowledge of humanities scholarship and apply professional experience and skills to the design and delivery of research infrastructure services. In whatever role I have played as data and technology support professional I have advocated for this research community, collaborated within and where opportunity has arisen participated in events and research projects. The advocacy has involved delivering presentations at the eResearch Australasia, THETA and VALA conferences articulating the needs of digital humanities researchers and observations on the evolution of the research practice. The collaboration has involved coordinating and aligning an international event (2015 LODLAM Summit) with the international Digital Humanities conference and reviewing papers and chairing a session on linked open data. The participation has involved attending in the Australasian Association’s biennial conferences and joining in on or helping to coordinate THATCamps.

In the world of “eResearch” dominated by an understanding of data and technology intensive science I am committed to raising awareness and increasing understanding about the research practices and infrastructure needs of digital humanities researchers. The public biography provided for public speaking engagements makes plain my interest in the research community: “I am a self-professed metadata nerd and technologist who has found a work-space that satisfies my interests in culture, the humanities, semantics and the web.” I am committed to supporting and engaging colleagues both in their research or support roles in digital humanities. Where feasible I would also like to influence decision-makers in their thinking and funders in their investment choices, to the benefit of this research community.

Camellia Webb-Gannon (return to top of page)
Research Fellow, Digital Humanities Research Group, Western Sydney University

Frequently characterized by its application of digital investigative methods to humanities topics, digital humanities (DH) also analyses arts and cultural digitization-related changes in the humanities. This latter focus is where, I believe, my background and interests, including a focus on critical and post- colonial DH, would allow me to make a valuable contribution to the aaDH executive committee and to the advancement of DH in Australia and the Pacific more broadly. The research I conducted for my PhD (awarded by The University of Sydney in 2012) examined how West Papuans’ creative cultures and practices sustain their independence movement. Many such practices were collaboratively produced using digital platforms, the analysis of which comprised an important element of my research.

Since 2014 I have been a Digital Humanities Research Group research fellow at Western Sydney University (WSU). I am second CI on an ARC-funded Linkage grant examining how mobile phones are used to create and distribute resistance music within Melanesia’s decolonisation movements, working with a team of digital ethnographers, ethnomusicologists, app developers and conflict analysts from Australian and French universities and the Wantok Musik Foundation. I am collaborating with Human Rights Watch’s satellite experts on a project to monitor land changes indicative of human rights violations on an Indonesian-government designated ‘food and energy estate’ in West Papua that has proved deadly for journalists reporting on it. Utilising actor network theory and object oriented ontology theory, the project examines how satellites act as ‘peace journalists’ and landmarks as journalistic ‘sources’. My forthcoming paper in Fibreculture (co-authored) critiques human rights applications of satellites, and my forthcoming paper in The Contemporary Pacific (co-authored) examines the online expression, through song, of a newly politicised Melanesian identity. I convened a panel at DH2015 on Melanesia’s music industry and digital identity, and am designing WSU’s first undergraduate DH unit.

 Posted by at 3:22 pm
Mar 102015
 

The $20,000 Redmond Barry Fellowship applications close on 17 April 2015.

The 2014 Fellowship shall be awarded to scholars and writers to facilitate research and the production of works of literature that utilise the superb collections of the State Library of Victoria and the University of Melbourne.

Up to $20,000 shall be awarded to assist with travel, living and research expenses. Fellows will be based at the State Library of Victoria for three to six months. During this period, Fellows will be expected to pursue their own project, present a lecture or short seminar series open to the public, Library and University communities, and submit a brief report at the conclusion of their Fellowship.

Fellowships are open to scholars and writers from Australia and overseas. The Fellow’s project may be in any discipline or area in which the Library and the University have strong collections.

The link is as follows: http://www.unimelb.edu.au/culturalcollections/events/redmondbarry.html

 Posted by at 2:08 pm
Jun 022014
 

Registrations now open for Melbourne THATCamp 2014, Pedagogy!

http://www.2014.thatcampmelbourne.org/

thatcamp_melb_mj

THATCamp, Melbourne, 2014, Pedagogy will be held at the University of Melbourne on the 10-11 October, 2014.

THATCamp is all about participation, discussion, and fun through fostering a productive, collegial environment. The program for THATCamp is created and managed by participants on the day who vote on the sessions proposed.

In preparation for the event we ask you to start thinking about some potential topics to workshop on the day. The core theme of THATCamp Melbourne is pedagogy.

To get the ball rolling, here are some suggestions: ‘blended learning’ in humanities teaching,  spaces for learning with technology, the creation, access and critical use of digital resources in teaching; grading and assessment through learning management systems,  and social media in the humanities, for instance, effective moderation of social media tools for teaching.

What are the contemporary challenges of teaching and how may some of the resources, perspectives, and methods developed in the digital humanities help address these challenges?

We look forward to your proposals,

Kind regards,

Amanda, Craig, and Fiona

 Posted by at 1:16 pm
Apr 172014
 

Dear Melbourne DH folk,

Following the DHA 2014 conference in Perth, a group of us are keen to start a
regular Melbourne get-together for people working in and around the digital
humanities, with the working title: “DH at the Pub”.

Our first session is proposed for Wednesday 7 May from 5:30pm at the Prince Alfred
pub (PA’s) on Grattan St, Carlton. Please spread the word to colleagues and friends
who may be interested. As an extra incentive, there will be free beers for those who
arrive early!

For our inaugural event we would like to discuss: where to meet (we want to be
Melbourne-wide, not Melbourne Uni focused so are open to suggestions); how often;
the purpose and focus of the group; what we want to be called; and how we should
communicate (a dedicated email list, Twitter, etc.). The more people who can come
along to contribute their views, the better.

Thanks – we look forward to seeing you at the first Melbourne DH at the Pub session
on 7 May!

Mike Jones

 Posted by at 3:01 pm